Sunday, January 12, 2014

Finally

As I approach my 29th birthday, I've decided to finally jump on the wagon and take the Architect Registration Exam (ARE). As with most things I do, I need to have a goal and so my goal is simply to become an architect before I turn 30 in February of 2015.  This essentially gives me 13 months to pass the exams.

The ARE for those of you who are unfamiliar with the road to architectural licensure, is actually composed of seven (yes, 7) exams, each of which requires a great deal of studying and preparation. Just yesterday I began studying for my first exam, Construction Documents & Services, an exam which is statistically one of the more difficult exams.

A friend of mine who recently completed the ARE and is now a registered architect (am I jealous?...hell yes I'm jealous) informed me that as difficult as the CDS exam is, it is at least one of the most straightforward exams - and definitely a good exam to start with so as not to have any incorrect assumptions about the other six exams (such as, "Wow, these are f***ing easy!  I'm going to be an architect in no time!").

So with that said, wish me luck.  I'll keep you posted.  -R

Monday, November 11, 2013

Life Lessons We've Learned From Running (The Huffington Post)

Runners come in all different shapes, sizes and ages, and they all come with different goals: losing weight, finishing a marathon, setting a personal record. Even as a group of like-minded health editors, we are all different runners. But we can agree on one thing: Running is a source of endless wisdom -- it's not just about fitness. Here are a few of the things being a runner has taught us.

1. You are stronger than you think.

2. Every run is different. You can run the same loop at the same time two days in a row and feel like the queen of the world one day and the scum of the earth the next. It doesn't say anything about you as a person -- except that you're normal.

3. There is a fine line between being in pain and being injured. You have to learn where your line is and when to stop.

4. Take rest days.

5. There's something magical and indescribable about a comfortable pace and a good playlist.

6. The runner's high is real, and once you've experienced it, there's no turning back.



7. It's perfectly acceptable to skip happy hour because you were really looking forward to that evening (or tomorrow's early-morning) run.

8. Sometimes cheering for a runner is even better than running.

9. Fancy gadgets and gear are fun, but they don't make you a runner.

10. Running a "real race" is not a prerequisite to calling yourself a runner. But don't be intimidated to try one.

11. Running is all about you. You determine your own goals. For some, that's a marathon. For others, it's making it around the block.

12. Focusing on the horizon can make each step in front of you feel easier.



13. There are meditative powers in clearing your mind and focusing on your breath or the sound of your feet.

14. The best way to explore a new city or learn a new route is on foot.

15. Running is a common denominator. Runners always have something to talk about together.

16. Sometimes the only thing holding you back is your own mind.


Klein, Sarah, Jordan K. Turgeon, and Meredith Melnick. "Life Lessons We've Learned From Running." The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 10 Nov. 2013. Web. 11 Nov. 2013.

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

LineSync Architecture

Yesterday concluded an inspiring two years at LineSync Architecture in Wilmington, Vermont.  The following video successfully encapsulates the palpable energy of LineSync, a place that will forever mean so much to me.


LineSync Architecture - Wilmington, Vermont from Chibi Moku on Vimeo.

Sunday, September 2, 2012

Thursday, July 21, 2011

SHELTER (Vimeo.com)


SHELTER from jason sussberg on Vimeo.
16mm color film. 6:43 min.

Lloyd Kahn claims that shelter is more than a roof over your head. As the author and publisher of over a dozen books on home construction, Lloyd has been grappling with the concept of home, physically and psychically, for over five decades. Situated in the financial and housing crisis, this film profiles Lloyd's ideas on do-it-yourself construction and sustainability.

Follow Lloyd Kahn's great blog here.